Ginger

Product Name – Ginger
Specification –   
Cultivation Type – Common & Organic
Form –  Fresh & Dry 
Qnty –  1X20′ FCL > &  1X40′ FCL >
Shipment Terms –  FOB / CIF / DDP / CRF
Payment Termes –  L/C , D/P , D/A , O/A 
Orgin Port –  Colombo SriLanka
Packaging Terms –  25 kg Bags Standard

On the other hand, additional research studies showed no benefits of using ginger for treating motion sickness (Wood et al. 2005). Results of this trial indicated that compared with a baseline, nausea and vomiting in the ginger group were significantly less than those reported by the vitamin B6 group (Ensiyeh and Sakineh 2009). Although the antiemetic effects of ginger are the most well-studied effects of this condiment and have been reviewed extensively, the effectiveness and safety of ginger for treating nausea and vomiting have been questioned in the past because the findings reported were often contradictory (Wilkinson 2000b). One study indicated that pretreatment with ginger extracts reversed experimentally induced delay in gastric emptying in rats (Gupta and Sharma 2001), and ginger was also reported to reduce food transit time in experimental rats, an effect that might have implications in the prevention of colon cancer or constipation (Platel and Srinivasan 2001). 2004). 1988). 2006; Thompson and Potter 2006; Quimby 2007). 2004).

At the same time, ginger continues to be recommended for alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with pregnancy, chemotherapy, and certain surgical procedures. Nausea and vomiting during pregnancy affects most pregnant women, and over the years ginger has been used to try to alleviate the condition (Aikins Murphy 1998; Jewell and Young 2000, 2002, 2003; Fugh-Berman and Kronenberg 2003; Boone and Shields 2005; Borrelli et al. Although the mechanism is not clear, ginger appears to have no adverse side effects and never seems to worsen nausea and vomiting. 1994) and is found to be superior to dimenhydrinate (Dramamine) or placebo against symptoms of motion sickness (Mowrey and Clayson 1982). However, the results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial indicated that ginger did not provide any additional benefit in reducing CINV when given with a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (HT3) receptor antagonist and/or aprepitant (a substance P antagonist; Zick et al. 1988; Stewart et al.

 

A survey of a group of obstetricians and gynecologists revealed that most of them would recommend taking an antiemetic (71.3%), and specifically ginger (51.8%), to patients suffering from moderate to severe nausea (Power, Holzman, and Shulkin 2001).Ginger has been recommended to combat nausea associated with chemotherapy (Sharma and Gupta 1998; Grant and Lutz 2000). A follow-up study also indicated that 1 g of ginger might be effective in reducing the subjective severity of seasickness in naval cadets on the high seas (Grontved et al. However, rats that were administered cisplatin and -gingerol exhibited lower lipid peroxidation and conservation of GSH coupled with enhanced superoxide dismutase and catalase, which resulted in a restoration of normal renal function (Kuhad et al. Complementary intervention with ginger has also been suggested to have possible benefits in preventing acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in children (Dupuis and Nathan 2003). 2008).Ginger was suggested to be an effective postoperative prophylactic antiemetic (Phillips, Ruggier, and Hutchinson 1993) that is not associated with effects on gastric emptying (Phillips, Ruggier, and Hutchinson 1993). Although nausea was less in the ginger group at 2 hours postprocedure, vomiting did not vary between the two groups (Apariman, Ratchanon, and Wiriyasirivej 2006).

However, at 6 hours, patients who had received ginger reported significantly less nausea and vomiting than the placebo group (Apariman, Ratchanon, and Wiriyasirivej 2006). Results of another similar trial indicated that ginger (1 g) taken 1 hour before major gynecologic surgery decreased nausea and vomiting at 2 and 6 hours postsurgery compared to placebo, and had no adverse side effects (Nanthakomon and Pongrojpaw 2006). Importantly, no differences in birth weight, gestational age, or frequencies of congenital abnormalities have been observed between ginger-treated and untreated mothers (Willetts, Ekangaki, and Eden 2003). 2008). 2009). In a later randomized, double-blind, controlled trial, pregnant women were randomly divided to receive either 650 mg of ginger or 25 mg of vitamin B6 (3xd/4 days). These results were supported in an additional trial in which pregnant women with nausea were randomized into groups to receive either 1 g of ginger/day or 40 mg of vitamin B6/day for 4 days. 1999).Several groups have studied the effectiveness of ginger in preventing nausea associated with gynecological laparoscopy.

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The effectiveness of ginger has been compared with that of vitamin B6 (another recommended therapy) in randomized, double-blind, controlled trials. Gingerol was reported to reduce cisplatin (a platinum-based chemotherapy drug)-induced emesis in a vomiting model of mink possibly by inhibiting the central or peripheral increase of 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, and substance P (Qian et al. 2005; Bryer 2005; Chrubasik, Pittler, and Roufogalis 2005; White 2007). The exact antiemetic mechanism of ginger is not clear, although some evidence suggests that it inhibits serotonin receptors and exerts its antiemetic effects directly on the gastrointestinal system and in the central nervous system (Der Marderosian and Beutler 2006). 1998). This compound showed weaker pungency but more potent antiulcer activity than -gingerol or -shogaol (Yoshikawa et al. 7.6.3. Ginger as an Antinausea AgentThe most common and well-established use of ginger throughout history is probably its utilization in alleviating symptoms of nausea and vomiting. In contrast, at least one trial indicated that ginger was not effective in reducing the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing gynecologic laparoscopy (Eberhart et al. Randomized trials suggest that although ginger might not be as potent as some treatments (Jewell and Young 2000), its consumption for treating nausea or vomiting or both in early pregnancy has very few or no adverse side effects and seems to be effective (Niebyl 1992; Jackson 2001; Vutyavanich, Kraisarin, and Ruangsri 2001; Jewell and Young 2002; Niebyl and Goodwin 2002). Women who received ginger (250-mg capsules) appeared to experience less vomiting and nausea compared to those receiving placebo (Ozgoli, Goli, and Simbar 2009), and ginger also relieved pain from primary dysmenorrhea (Ozgoli, Goli, and Simbar 2009). Cisplatin can cause renal oxidative and nitrosative stress and dysfunction.

However, the effectiveness of ginger in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting has been disputed (Visalyaputra et al. 1991), and at least one group reported that patients receiving ginger extract for treating osteoarthritis experienced more, although mild, gastrointestinal adverse events compared to a placebo-treated group (Altman and Marcussen 2001). 2009). A similar review of the literature regarding the safety and efficacy of ginger in the management of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy revealed that ginger appears to be a relatively low-risk and effective treatment for these symptoms (Boone and Shields 2005). 2005; Bryer 2005; Mahesh, Perumal, and Pandi 2005; Chaiyakunapruk et al. Results indicated that ginger and vitamin B6 therapy were equally effective in reducing nausea and the number of vomiting episodes during pregnancy (Sripramote and Lekhyananda 2003; Smith et al. In fact, ginger has been reported to be as effective as dimenhydrinate (i.e., Dramamine) in treating nausea and vomiting in pregnancy with fewer side effects (Pongrojpaw, Somprasit, and Chanthasenanont 2007). The digestive stimulatory effects of ginger and other spices might be associated with positive effects on trypsin and pancreatic lipase (Platel and Srinivasan 2000) and ginger’s ability to increase gastric motility (Micklefield et al. Patients who took ginger (1 g) appeared to experience less nausea incidence, especially within 2-4 hours of the procedure, and some reported less vomiting also (Pongrojpaw and Chiamchanya 2003). 2003; Willetts, Ekangaki, and Eden 2003).

In this case, ginger actually appeared to be more effective than vitamin B6, with only minor side effects (Chittumma, Kaewkiattikun, and Wiriyasiriwach 2007). The effectiveness of ginger as an antiemetic has been attributed to its carminative effect, which helps to break up and expel intestinal gas. This idea was supported by the results of a randomized, double-blind trial in which healthy volunteers reported that ginger effectively accelerated gastric emptying and stimulated antral contractions (Wu et al. 2003). Notably, compared with a normal diet, high-protein meals with ginger consumed twice daily were reported to reduce the delayed nausea of chemotherapy and decrease the use of antiemetic medications (Levine et al. 2006). In contrast, addition of ginger root powder (1 g/day) to a standard antiemetic regimen with metoclopramide had no advantage in reducing nausea or vomiting in acute or delayed phases of cisplatin-induced emesis in gynecologic cancer patients (Manusirivithaya et al. 1992). 1994).Ginger root is commonly recommended for preventing seasickness (Schmid et al. Finally, a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials comparing ginger with placebo in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting revealed that a fixed dose of at least 1 g of ginger appears to be more effective than placebo (Chaiyakunapruk et al. Previously, -gingesulfonic acid, isolated from ginger root, was showed to be effective against HCl/ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats (Yoshikawa et al. 2006). A systematic review of the results of other double-blind, randomized, controlled trials, uncontrolled trials, case reports, and observational studies indicated that ginger is superior to placebo and as effective as vitamin B6 in relieving the severity of nausea and vomiting, with no reported side effects or adverse effects on pregnancy (Borrelli et al.

The benefits and dangers of herbal treatment of liver and gastrointestinal distress have been reviewed (Langmead and Rampton 2001), and several controlled studies have reported that ginger is generally effective as an antiemetic (Aikins Murphy 1998; Ernst and Pittler 2000; Jewell and Young 2000, 2002, 2003; Langmead and Rampton 2001; Dupuis and Nathan 2003; Boone and Shields 2005; Borrelli et al. Several double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials have indicated that ginger consumption is effective and safe in helping to prevent nausea and vomiting during pregnancy (Portnoi et al. Overall, these results suggest that ginger is probably fairly effective in alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with a variety of conditions. At least one survey indicated that the overall use of dietary supplements in pregnant women appears to be low, but ginger is commonly recommended and used to prevent nausea (Tsui, Dennehy, and Tsourounis 2001). These results were supported by a later study involving 60 patients who received either 3 g of ginger or placebo 1 hour before the procedure

In this case, ginger actually appeared to be more effective than vitamin B6, with only minor side effects (Chittumma, Kaewkiattikun, and Wiriyasiriwach 2007). The effectiveness of ginger as an antiemetic has been attributed to its carminative effect, which helps to break up and expel intestinal gas. This idea was supported by the results of a randomized, double-blind trial in which healthy volunteers reported that ginger effectively accelerated gastric emptying and stimulated antral contractions (Wu et al. 2003). Notably, compared with a normal diet, high-protein meals with ginger consumed twice daily were reported to reduce the delayed nausea of chemotherapy and decrease the use of antiemetic medications (Levine et al. 2006). In contrast, addition of ginger root powder (1 g/day) to a standard antiemetic regimen with metoclopramide had no advantage in reducing nausea or vomiting in acute or delayed phases of cisplatin-induced emesis in gynecologic cancer patients (Manusirivithaya et al. 1992). 1994).Ginger root is commonly recommended for preventing seasickness (Schmid et al. Finally, a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials comparing ginger with placebo in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting revealed that a fixed dose of at least 1 g of ginger appears to be more effective than placebo (Chaiyakunapruk et al. Previously, -gingesulfonic acid, isolated from ginger root, was showed to be effective against HCl/ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats (Yoshikawa et al. 2006). A systematic review of the results of other double-blind, randomized, controlled trials, uncontrolled trials, case reports, and observational studies indicated that ginger is superior to placebo and as effective as vitamin B6 in relieving the severity of nausea and vomiting, with no reported side effects or adverse effects on pregnancy (Borrelli et al.

The benefits and dangers of herbal treatment of liver and gastrointestinal distress have been reviewed (Langmead and Rampton 2001), and several controlled studies have reported that ginger is generally effective as an antiemetic (Aikins Murphy 1998; Ernst and Pittler 2000; Jewell and Young 2000, 2002, 2003; Langmead and Rampton 2001; Dupuis and Nathan 2003; Boone and Shields 2005; Borrelli et al. Several double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials have indicated that ginger consumption is effective and safe in helping to prevent nausea and vomiting during pregnancy (Portnoi et al. Overall, these results suggest that ginger is probably fairly effective in alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with a variety of conditions. At least one survey indicated that the overall use of dietary supplements in pregnant women appears to be low, but ginger is commonly recommended and used to prevent nausea (Tsui, Dennehy, and Tsourounis 2001). These results were supported by a later study involving 60 patients who received either 3 g of ginger or placebo 1 hour before the procedure

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Launched simply, this business is now a major supplier of spices in Sri Lanka and several countries in the world under the M.D. S brand.

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